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Dynamically Generating OpenGraph Images With Hugo

I've lately seen some folks on social.lol posting about their various strategies for automatically generating Open Graph images for their Eleventy sites. So this weekend I started exploring how I could do that for my Hugo site1. During my search, I came across a few different approaches using external services or additional scripts to run at build time, but I was hoping for a way to do this with Hugo's built-in tooling.

Publish Services with Cloudflare Tunnel

I've written a bit lately about how handy Tailscale Serve and Funnel can be, and I continue to get a lot of great use out of those features. But not every networking nail is best handled with a Tailscale-shaped hammer. Funnel has two limitations that might make it less than ideal for certain situations. First, sites served with Funnel can only have a hostname in the form of server.tailnet-name.ts.net. You can't use a custom domain for this, but you might not always want to advertise that a service is shared via Tailscale.

Tailscale Serve in a Docker Compose Sidecar

Hi, and welcome back to what has become my Tailscale blog. I have a few servers that I use for running multiple container workloads. My approach in the past had been to use Caddy webserver on the host to proxy the various containers. With this setup, each app would have its own DNS record, and Caddy would be configured to route traffic to the appropriate internal port based on that. For instance:

Easy Push Notifications With ntfy.sh

The Pitch Wouldn't it be great if there was a simple way to send a notification to your phone(s) with just a curl call? Then you could get notified when a script completes, a server reboots, a user logs in to a system, or a sensor connected to Home Assistant changes state. How great would that be?? ntfy.sh (pronounced notify) provides just that. It's an open-source, easy-to-use, HTTP-based notification service, and it can notify using mobile apps for Android (Play or F-Droid) or iOS (App Store) or a web app.

Tailscale golink: Private Shortlinks for your Tailnet

I've shared in the past about how I use custom search engines in Chrome as quick web shortcuts. And I may have mentioned my love for Tailscale a time or two as well. Well I recently learned of a way to combine these two passions: Tailscale golink. The golink announcement post on the Tailscale blog offers a great overview of the service: Using golink, you can create and share simple go/name links for commonly accessed websites, so that anyone in your network can access them no matter the device they’re on — without requiring browser extensions or fiddling with DNS settings.

Gitea: Ultralight Self-Hosted Git Server

I recently started using Obsidian for keeping notes, tracking projects, and just generally organizing all the information that would otherwise pass into my brain and then fall out the other side. Unlike other similar solutions which operate entirely in The Cloud, Obsidian works with Markdown files stored in a local folder1, which I find to be very attractive. Not only will this allow me to easily transfer my notes between apps if I find something I like better than Obsidian, but it also opens the door to using git to easily back up all this important information.

Snikket Private XMPP Chat on Oracle Cloud Free Tier

Non-technical users deserve private communications, too. I shared a few months back about the steps I took to deploy my own Matrix homeserver instance, and I've happily been using the Element client for secure end-to-end encrypted chats with a small group of my technically-inclined friends. Being able to have private conversations without having to trust a single larger provider (unlike like Signal or WhatsApp) is pretty great. Of course, many Matrix users just create accounts directly on the matrix.

Cloud-hosted WireGuard VPN for remote homelab access

For a while now, I've been using an OpenVPN Access Server virtual appliance for remotely accessing my homelab. That's worked fine but it comes with a lot of overhead. It also requires maintaining an SSL certificate and forwarding three ports through my home router, in addition to managing a fairly complex software package and configurations. The free version of the OpenVPN server also only supports a maximum of two simultaneous connections.

Federated Matrix Server (Synapse) on Oracle Cloud's Free Tier

I've heard a lot lately about how generous Oracle Cloud's free tier is, particularly when compared with the free offerings from other public cloud providers. Signing up for an account was fairly straight-forward, though I did have to wait a few hours for an actual human to call me on an actual telephone to verify my account. Once in, I thought it would be fun to try building my own Matrix homeserver to really benefit from the network's decentralized-but-federated model for secure end-to-end encrypted communications.

AdGuard Home in Docker on Photon OS

I was recently introduced to AdGuard Home by way of its very slick Home Assistant Add-On. Compared to the relatively-complicated Pi-hole setup that I had implemented several months back, AdGuard Home was much simpler to deploy (particularly since I basically just had to click the "Install" button from the Home Assistant add-ons manage). It also has a more modern UI with options arranged more logically (to me, at least), and it just feels easier to use overall.

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 jbowdre